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Press Briefs


Our Chance to Show We’re Serious About Global Health

Researchers are racing to develop an effective vaccine for Ebola, hoping to stop the outbreak’s spread, save lives, and put an end to the enormous suffering caused by this vicious infection. But even as we scramble to respond to Ebola, much of the world lives out of reach of lifesaving vaccines developed years ago. We lose well over a million children every year to vaccine-preventable diseases.

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It’s Time for Congress to Put Working Families First

On September 16, Census Bureau released its latest income data, showing that about one in seven Americans still lives below the poverty line. Meanwhile, important provisions of the Earned Income Tax Credit – one of the country’s most effective anti-poverty strategies – are set to expire if Congress doesn’t act. As we head into elections, what our elected officials do – or don’t do – in Washington has real consequences everyone back at home. 

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As girls risk their lives for education, it’s time for us to stand behind them

As the world reels from the tragic kidnapping of schoolgirls in Nigeria, everyone asks “what can we do?” There is no simple answer. But this June the U.S. government has the chance to move us closer to a time when all children can go to school and learn, regardless of where they live or who they are.

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Help Fulfill Malala’s Dream: Support Quality Education for 29 Million Children

This spring, the Global Partnership aims to raise $3.5 billion to support education for 29 million of the poorest and most vulnerable children. It is time the United States pledges to do its part, helping build a better educated world by committing $250 million over two years.

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On International Women’s Day, Invest in Education for Girls

This spring, donors will come together to pledge support for  the Global Partnership for Education (GPE), the only international organization dedicated to quality education for all. The U.S. must commit to do its part, investing in the world’s children through GPE.

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Dr. Deborah Birx an Outstanding Choice for Global AIDS Coordinator, says RESULTS

Today the White House took an important step toward achieving its global health goals by nominating Dr. Deborah Birx as U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator. In this role, Dr. Birx will lead the country’s global response to HIV/AIDS through the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) and U.S. engagement with the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria.

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Senate calls for political reform in Bangladesh and continued independence of Grameen Bank

Last night the U.S. Senate passed a resolution expressing the need for political reform in Bangladesh and the continued independence of Grameen Bank. The resolution, S. Res. 318, comes on the heels of widely boycotted national elections in Bangladesh earlier this week, noting that political reform is critical to the country’s stability. It also urges the government of Bangladesh to restore the autonomy of Grameen Bank, which provides access to credit and other vital services to more than 8 million of the poorest women in the country.

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Honoring the legacy of Nelson Mandela

Today the RESULTS family mourns the loss of Nelson Mandela, one of history’s great champions for a more equitable and just world. Among the many battles he fought alongside the poor and the marginalized, Mandela had a commitment to ending the suffering caused by tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS. 

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U.S. will match contributions to the Global Fund, up to $5 billion over three years

Statement from Joanne Carter, Executive Director of RESULTS and RESULTS Educational Fund, lauding the President’s commitment to the Global Fund.

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Hunger For Justice: Protecting Children and Families from Severe SNAP (Food Stamp) Cuts

House and Senate negotiators are meeting this month to finalize a Farm Bill, including the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly food stamps). SNAP is still the first line of defense against hunger in the U.S. With 47 million Americans, nearly half of them children (22 million), currently receiving SNAP, it is literally putting food on the table low-income families across America. Unfortunately, SNAP has been targeted for major cuts in Congress, particularly in the House of Representatives. On September 19, the House passed H.R.3102, which would cut SNAP by $39 billion over the next ten years, and now House and Senate leaders are negotiating over a final bill. We are stronger as a people and a nation because of programs like SNAP. To abandon those values now would dramatically increase poverty, hurt our economic recovery, and send a terrible message to millions of low-income children and families that their country no longer cares.

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Joanne Carter elected as Vice-Chair of the global Stop TB Partnership Coordinating Board

October 22, 2013

RESULTS and RESULTS Educational Fund Executive Director Joanne Carter elected as Vice-Chair of the global Stop TB Partnership Coordinating Board.

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U.S. Must Continue to Lead on Ending Global Epidemics

October 15, 2013

This December, leaders from around the world will meet in Washington, D.C., to decide the future of the global effort against the world’s deadliest pandemics. At the donor pledging conference hosted by the U.S. government, the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria will work to raise $15 billion to support an ambitious new strategy to defeat these three diseases. There is a clear choice: invest in a plan to end these epidemics, or pass on a historic opportunity to tackle two ancient killers, malaria and tuberculosis (TB), and the modern plague of HIV/AIDS. The U.S. has already taken up the mantle of leadership by committing to host the donor conference. But now, to ensure the success of the pledging conference, and ultimately success in the fight against these diseases, the U.S. must commit its fair share by pledging $5 billion to the Global Fund over the next three years.

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Drug Resistant TB an Urgent Threat

Although usually treatable with a course of inexpensive drugs ($22–50), TB kills 1.4 million people every year, making it the most deadly curable infectious disease in the world. One-third of the global population carries the bacterium that causes TB, and nearly 9 million will become sick with active TB in a year. TB continues to be the biggest killer of people with HIV, taking one in four lives of those who die of AIDS-related causes.

When TB is treated improperly or inconsistently, the disease develops resistance to the limited number of effective drugs available. Though overall TB death rates have dropped by 41 percent since 1990, hard-to-treat drug-resistant TB is surging because of poor or incomplete treatment. And those with active drug-resistant TB transmit the drug-resistant TB strain to others.

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10 Years On, Funding Crisis Threatens the Global Fund’s Effort to End AIDS

On January 28, 2012, the world marks the 10-year anniversary of the launch of the most successful global health effort in history — The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. Nearly eight million lives have been saved through Global Fund investments to-date, and even greater progress is on the horizon, thanks to recent scientific breakthroughs and the achievements of the last decade.

Against the backdrop of success and future promise, however, the Global Fund’s mission is in jeopardy. During the economic downturn that may only now be coming to an end, a number of wealthy countries either cut their pledges to the Global Fund or have failed to deliver the money they promised. Without the necessary resources in hand, the Global Fund was forced to announce on November 23, 2011 — a mere week before World AIDS Day — that it was cancelling its next round of grant-making (Round 11) and would stop making new grants for at least two years.

To understand just how damaging and ironic this stoppage is, we must go back in time a decade to the Global Fund’s creation.

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2011 World AIDS Day Editorial Packet

A global conversation is beginning about the possibility of the end of AIDS. December 1, World AIDS Day, is the ideal time for RESULTS advocates to help deepen the conversation through our latest editorial packet.  

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Education Editorial Packet

Back to School Time — But Not If You’re a Girl in Mali

There are 34.7 million elementary school children in the U.S. getting ready to go back to school in August and September.[1] But around the world, the reality is that nearly double that number — 67 million — won’t go to school at all; the majority of these children are girls. Unless more effective policies are implemented and there is greater international support, 72 million children may still be out of school by 2015 — more than in 2008. Millions more will receive a poor-quality education and not be able to read, write, or count. We must do our part to ensure the poorest and hardest-to-reach children — especially girls — can go to school and learn.


* On August 24, 2011, the Fast Track Initiative (FTI) officially changed its name to the Global Partnership for Education (GPE). The change will be announced on September 21 at the UN General Assembly.

[1] National Center for Education Statistics. http://nces.ed.gov/fastfacts/display.asp?id=65

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U.S. can help save more than 4 million children through global vaccination pledge

Thanks to two new vaccines that can provide immunity from pneumococcal disease (the main cause of pneumonia) and rotavirus (the leading cause of severe, dehydrating diarrhea), we have the opportunity to prevent the deaths of 4.2 million children worldwide by 2015. Getting those vaccinations to the children who need them, however, will require a U.S. contribution of at least $450 million over the next 3 years to the GAVI Alliance, a global partnership to improve access to new and underused vaccines.

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Cuts That Kill Editorial Packet

We’ve been receiving some great media from the U.S. and around the world in step with RESULTS Executive Director Joanne Carter’s Huffington Post article “Cuts That Kill,” calling for Congress not to cut essential foreign aid spending. See the editorial packet (pdf).

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Congress Should Uphold Bipartisan Legacy on HIV/AIDS and Global Health

As we approach this World AIDS Day on December 1, our country is politically divided. Economic crisis, disagreement on policies, electoral politics, and historic distrust have pitted the two major parties against one another. A survey of the post-election commentary shows each party paying lip service to bipartisanship, but few concrete proposals for cooperation have yet emerged. Recommitting the United States to a leadership role in global health is an issue that is ripe for such cooperation across the aisle.

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Obama Pledge to Global Fund Can Bring Millennium Goals Within Reach

In a speech before the United Nations General Assembly last September, President Obama declared, “We will support the Millennium Development Goals, and approach next year's summit with a global plan to make them a reality.” As the time approaches to present that plan, a substantial, multi-year pledge to the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and Malaria is essential for achieving the 2015 MDGs related to global health. To continue the work of life-saving programs and to accelerate the progress against these killer diseases, the United States must commit to contributing $6 billion to the Global Fund over a three-year period beginning in 2012. Download the full document here in MS Word.

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Recipients of Presidential Medal of Freedom Urge Obama to Create Global Fund for Education

What do a banker to the poor, a former president, and a religious leader have in common? They are among the first recipients of the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Barack Obama — and they have all called for the creation of a Global Fund for Education.

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Press Brief: Obama Must Make Good on Commitment to Global Fund for Education

Press brief detailing why it is critical that President Obama lead the charge for primary education worldwide.

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World TB Day 2009 Editorial Packet

Impoverished people in developing countries share no blame in the current financial crisis, but they are the ones who could bear the consequences perhaps with their lives — of mistakes made by Wall Street investors.

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World AIDS Day 2008 Editorial Packet: Fighting AIDS Means Fighting TB

President-elect Obama must ensure that the five-year, $48 billion Lantos-Hyde Act that he helped pass as a senator this summer is fully funded, allowing the reauthorization of the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), as well as programs for TB and malaria.

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Reforming Foreign Aid

Providing assistance to poor countries has helped the U.S. build positive relationships with other nations and demonstrates the best aspects of U.S. engagement on the world stage. When invested wisely, foreign aid both reflects American values of compassion and justice and serves our national interest in a stable, peaceful world.

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Ensure Funding for Historic Global Health Bill

President Bush has signed the Tom Lantos and Henry J. Hyde United States Global Leadership Against HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria Reauthorization Act of 2008 into law. This is an historic global health bill, authorizing an unprecedented $48 billion to fight three of the world’s deadliest infectious diseases.

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PEPFAR Editorial Packet: Time Running Out on AIDS, TB and Malaria Bill

While great strides have been made against AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria over the last five years, more than 5 million people continue to perish from these diseases annually. The Lantos-Hyde U.S. Global Leadership Against HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria Reauthorization Act of 2008 sets bold targets and authorizes America's share of the resources needed to turn back these infectious killers.

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PEPFAR Editorial Packet: Time Running Out to Pass Major Global Health Act

When President Bush traveled to Africa, he noted the progress made against AIDS, thanks in no small part to the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR). Widely acknowledged as one of the greatest achievements of the Bush administration, the resources provided by PEPFAR have undoubtedly saved millions of lives around the world. But now that PEPFAR is being considered for reauthorization, the greatest bipartisan effort in recent years has run into an unfortunate congressional roadblock.

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June 2008 PEPFAR Editorial Packet

The most important global health legislation in U.S. history doesn't need more votes. It needs more leadership.

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May 2008 PEPFAR Editorial Packet

During his recent trip to Africa, President Bush noted the progress made against AIDS, thanks in no small part to the U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR). The emergence of drug-resistant tuberculosis, however, threatens to undermine that progress.

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Child Survival Editorial Packet

For mothers in the world's poorest nations, losing a child is an all too common occurrence.

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U.S. Must Do More on Global Education

Access to education is generally considered to be a fundamental right. But for millions of children around the world, even a basic education is unattainable.

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MDR-TB and PEPFAR Editorial Packet

During his week-long trip to Africa, President Bush noted the progress made against AIDS in that region, thanks in no small part to the U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR). The emergence of drug-resistant tuberculosis, however, threatens to undermine that progress.

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Drug-Resistant TB and PEPFAR Editorial Packet

People living with HIV/AIDS are much more susceptible to TB, and without effective diagnosis and treatment of drug resistant strains, TB becomes a rapid death sentence.

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2008 Campaigns: RESULTS Activists Nationwide Tackling Poverty at Home and Abroad in 2008

Whether poverty occurs in the slums of Nairobi or the foothills of Appalachia, it can be easier to turn away, and think that the problems are too big, too complex, for any one person to make a difference. The citizen volunteers and partners of RESULTS and RESULTS Educational Fund know that this is not true.

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UNICEF Calls for More Action to Halt Preventable Child Deaths Around the World

UNICEF's The State of the World's Children 2008 report returns to the topic of child survival. The report documents the tremendous progress in children's health in recent decades, highlights the strategies and partnerships that have proven most effective, and outlines the challenges that remain.

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Kenyan Crisis Shouldn’t Hide Importance of Ladders Out of Poverty

Loud emergencies like the post-election violence in Kenya obscure the fact that in the very same slums, in times of relative calm, the quiet emergency of global poverty is being addressed with ladders to climb out of poverty, something that safety nets rarely provide. That's a message World Bank President Robert Zoellick needs to hear when members of Congress meet with him in early 2008 and urge him to get more microloans to the very poor around the world.

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