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Foreign Aid Reform

America’s foreign assistance is not reaching its potential in responding to today’s global challenges. Aid programs often lack bold, measurable outcomes and are not guided by a coherent global development strategy. Restrictions on how U.S. assistance can be spent and failure to invest in cost-effective local capacity-building undermine U.S. leverage and impact. Inadequate tracking and evaluation limits the opportunities to build on success and learn from failure. And the amount and allocation of aid dollars does not reflect a clear priority to fight poverty and achieve the Millennium Development Goals.

— Beyond Assistance: The HELP Commission Report on Foreign Assistance Reform December 2007.

 

India: Pratham Supported Community LibraryAmerica's foreign assistance is not reaching its potential to respond to today's global challenges. Aid programs often lack bold, measurable outcomes and are not guided by a coherent global development strategy. Restrictions on how U.S. assistance can be spent and failure to invest in cost-effective local capacity-building undermine U.S. leverage and impact. Inadequate tracking and evaluation limits the opportunities to build on success and learn from failure. And the amount and allocation of aid dollars does not reflect a clear priority to fight poverty and achieve the Millennium Development Goals, which the U.S. committed to in 2000 and President Obama has pledged to make America's goals. Momentum in Congress toward new foreign aid reform legislation provides a unique opportunity to address these challenges.

RESULTS and Foreign Aid Reform Advocacy

RESULTS is committed to ensuring that reform of our foreign aid includes key principles that will make U.S. foreign assistance more effective, efficient, and focused on helping the 1.4 billion people living on less than $1.25 a day. We hope you'll learn more about foreign aid reform and how to take action.